Faculty Member

The current study examined the role of bisexual-specific distal stressors (i.e. anti-bisexual discrimination from heterosexuals and from lesbians and gay men) and proximal stressors (i.e. internalized binegativity and anticipated discrimination) in sexual compulsivity among bisexual men. Sexual compulsivity disproportionately affects gay and bisexual men and confers risk of sexually transmitted infections, including HIV. A total of 942 bisexual male adults, recruited primarily from three large cities in the United States and Canada, completed online self-report surveys. Results revealed that discrimination from lesbians and gay men (but not from heterosexuals) was associated with both internalized binegativity and anticipated discrimination. Internalized binegativity and anticipated discrimination, in turn, were associated with increased sexual compulsivity. Moreover, there was a significant indirect effect of discrimination from heterosexuals and from lesbians and gay men on sexual compulsivity through anticipated discrimination. There was also a significant indirect effect of discrimination from lesbians and gay men on sexual compulsivity through internalized binegativity. Results suggest that these bisexual-specific distal and proximal minority stressors are important risk factors for sexual compulsivity. As such, treatment providers are encouraged to address these underlying risk factors in treating sexual compulsivity among bisexual men.